• Visual Literacy
    • How we read comics
      • Panels
        • When the artist changes the size, shape or colour of panels it can mean different things
          • Size can be used to help with closure and tension. You can even use a whole page for an exciting movement 
      • Camera Angles
        • This gives us variety in the shots we see
          • Wide
            • Overall view of the scene 
          • Close up
            • Drama, tension and emotion
          • Extreme close up 
            • Tension
          • Overhead 
            • Vulnerable
      • Closure
        • This allows the reader to imagine what happens between the panels 
      • Words and pictures
        • Subtext is used to give more detail to a picture 
      • Motion 
        • The more motion lines there are the quicker things move 
      • Cliff-hangers
        • These are used to make the reader interested into what will happen next
      • Sound effects 
        • These are drawn so words look the same as they sound 
      • Symbols
        • This allows the reader to more easily understand the scene 
        • They can also add more information
      • Comic talk
        • Narration boxes
        • Thought bubbles 
        • Word balloons
      • Mood
        • Lighting, background and lines
          • Thick wavy lines give a threatening mood 
          • Thin lines give a peaceful mood
          • Darkness makes it scary
          • Wild lines suggest weirdness 
    • Contextual understandings
      • Texts can be based on either fact or fiction
      • Texts are produced for specific purposes and audiences
      • The use of language depends on shared cultural understandings 
      • Representations of social groups are often based on stereotyping 
      • The meaning of a text is limited by the context n which it is read or viewed 
      • A text may have different meanings for different people 
      • Texts are influenced by the cultural background for their products 
    • Linguistic structures and features 
      • Narrative point of view 
      • Narrative structures such as exposition and resolution 
      • Sequence in plot and sub-plot
      • Expository structures such as introduction and conclusion 
      • Setting 
        • Settings can indicate a mood in the scene
          • It can indicate tranquility or roughness for example
      • Characters 
        •  
      • Stereotypes
      • Codes eg. Symbolic, technical and written. 
    • How we read photographs and pictures
      • Objects
        • These can represent physical things
        • They can also represent emotions and feelings
      • Colour
        • White is innocent and black is dark with fear
        • Colourant are also used to indicate stereotypes
      • Settings
        • These have symbolic significance to a scene
          • Dryness can mean rugged and harsh
      • Clothing
        • This can reflect personality and the character of a person
      • Size
        • These indicate the significance of something 
          • Larger items in the foreground are more important 
      • Position
        • This can give meaning to an object
      • Direction
        • This says in what way objects are facing in a scene
          • They can change mood by hiding facial features for example
      • Angle
        • This is where the photographer has placed us in the scene 
      • Light 
        • Different lighting can change mood
      • Body language 
        • This tells us what a person is feeling
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